Staircase….

It could be just a transition space, a necessary provision to be crammed in a corner and forgotten about….
Or, a staircase can be the life of a house, looking at everything from its own curious (and literally lofty!) perspective, throwing light and breeze all around…
It could invite us to sit around with our coffee mugs and chat with our loved ones…. It’s a place to find a book, forget where you were headed and get lost in the pages…
A place to step up to something wonderful or fly down restfully if you wish!

Here, old (फडताळ) cabinet door planks are reused as treads, raised very gradually on Adobe walls. These steps, wide and low are truly a child’s play to climb up and down. Throughout the day, there is bright, cheery daylight streaming down from a clear storey in the roof…. Treated bamboo poles are embedded in the Adobe supports, as handrails…
Didn’t take any extraordinary materials or technology to build it… 🙂

PC Abhijit Gandhi

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Mud house in the woods…

I am planning to post pictures and descriptions of the recently finished projects on the blog from now… And in reference to that discuss various aspects of natural building. Watching how this works in coordination with th picture posts on the Instagram handle anujnadn

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People often look at the drawings of an earthen house and think that it looks too small…

1. Load bering earthen walls are much thicker than lean walls of a framed structure. Human eyes read the interior space in proportion to the walls and are not used to walls as thick as mud walls. That tricks the mind into assuming that the space is too small.

2. Most of the generic house designs involve a boxed space of standard dimensions without any considerations for the furniture, people and movement within that space. There is a lot of waste of space that ends up neither being of any physical use nor of any intentional aesthetic appeal….

If we look beyond these two common misunderstandings, we see that quality of space is not Directly proportional to the dimensions of the room!

Speaking of dimensions, this is indeed a small bedroom. 10’6″X16’6″ in size. All the furniture is built in and sculpted into its earthen walls, leaving plenty of space to walk around.
Spaces such as this one are designed inside out. First comes the space, movements in it and then the walls and furniture, merely a cocoon to embrace them all, snug and perfectly fit…. With wide windows giving glipses of the beautiful forest by the doorstep… and a roof incline, throwing sunlight just where you might need it next…